Philadelphia

Philadelphia, known colloquially as Philly, is the largest city in the U.S. state and Commonwealth of Pennsylvania, and the sixth-most populous U.S. city with a 2018 census-estimated population of 1,584,138.[8] Since 1854, the city has had the same geographic boundaries as Philadelphia County, the most populous county in Pennsylvania and the urban core of the eighth-largest U.S. metropolitan statistical area, with over 6 million residents as of 2017.[6] Philadelphia is also the economic and cultural anchor of the greater Delaware Valley, located along the lower Delaware and Schuylkill Rivers, within the Northeast megalopolis. The Delaware Valley's population of 7.2 million ranks it as the eighth-largest combined statistical area in the United States.[7]

Philadelphia is one of the oldest municipalities in the United States. William Penn, an English Quaker, founded the city in 1682 to serve as capital of the Pennsylvania Colony.[4][11] Philadelphia played an instrumental role in the American Revolution as a meeting place for the Founding Fathers of the United States, who signed the Declaration of Independence in 1776 at the Second Continental Congress, and the Constitution at the Philadelphia Convention of 1787. Several other key events occurred in Philadelphia during the Revolutionary War including the First Continental Congress, the preservation of the Liberty Bell, the Battle of Germantown, and the Siege of Fort Mifflin. Philadelphia remained the nation's largest city until being overtaken by New York City in 1790; the city was also one of the nation's capitals during the revolution, serving as temporary U.S. capital while Washington, D.C. was under construction. In the 19th century, Philadelphia became a major industrial center and a railroad hub. The city grew from an influx of European immigrants, most of whom came from Ireland, Italy and Germany—the three largest reported ancestry groups in the city as of 2015.[12] In the early 20th century, Philadelphia became a prime destination for African Americans during the Great Migration after the Civil War,[13] as well as Puerto Ricans.[14] The city's population doubled from one million to two million people between 1890 and 1950.

The Philadelphia area's many universities and colleges make it a top study destination, as the city has evolved into an educational and economic hub.[15][16] As of 2019, the Philadelphia metropolitan area is estimated to produce a gross metropolitan product (GMP) of $490 billion.[17] Philadelphia is the center of economic activity in Pennsylvania and is home to five Fortune 1000 companies. The Philadelphia skyline is expanding, with a market of almost 81,900 commercial properties in 2016,[18] including several nationally prominent skyscrapers.[19] Philadelphia has more outdoor sculptures and murals than any other American city.[20][21] Fairmount Park, when combined with the adjacent Wissahickon Valley Park in the same watershed, is one of the largest contiguous urban park areas in the United States.[22] The city is known for its arts, culture, cuisine, and colonial history, attracting 42 million domestic tourists in 2016 who spent $6.8 billion, generating an estimated $11 billion in total economic impact in the city and surrounding four counties of Pennsylvania.[23] Philadelphia has also emerged as a biotechnology hub.[24]

Philadelphia is the birthplace of the United States Marine Corps,[25][26] and is also the home of many U.S. firsts, including the first library (1731),[27] hospital (1751),[27] medical school (1765),[28] national capital (1774),[29] stock exchange (1790),[27] zoo (1874),[30] and business school (1881).[31] Philadelphia contains 67 National Historic Landmarks and the World Heritage Site of Independence Hall.[32] The city became a member of the Organization of World Heritage Cities in 2015,[33] as the first World Heritage City in the United States.[16] Although Philadelphia is rapidly undergoing gentrification, the city actively maintains strategies to minimize displacement of homeowners in gentrifying neighborhoods.[

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Sleeps upto 12, Washer & Dryer, Free Easy Parking
$125 $95 /day
Philadelphia
14 7 1 935 sqft
3 Queen Beds, 2 mins walk from Lawndale Train Stn
$95 $85 /day
Philadelphia
8 5 1 725 sqft
On East Roosevelt Boulevard, Easy Parking, Sleeps 10
$105 $85 /day
Philadelphia
10 5 1 825 sqft
Near Hunting Park Stn, All Basic necessities+wifi
$105 $95 /day
Philadelphia
7 4 1 820 sqft
Sleeps 16, 5 mins from Train Station, 2 Kitchen
$195 $145 /day
Philadelphia
16 8 2 1025 sqft
Fantastic Budget-Friendly Home 20 min frm Downtown
$145 $115 /day
Philadelphia
10 6 1 1438 sqft
2 Queen Beds, Near Public transit, Family Kitchen
$115 $95 /day
Philadelphia
4 2 1 930 sqft
On East Roosevelt Boulevard, EZ Parking, Sleeps 10
$115 $95 /day
Philadelphia
10 5 1 930 sqft

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63%
American Parks Trail end Rapid City
Philadelphia
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1 hour
from
$2.000 $737
35%
New York: Museum of Modern Art
Philadelphia
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1 hour
from
$900 $579
55%
Los Angeles to San Francisco Express
Philadelphia
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8 hours
from
$1.500 $666
78%
Cannes and Antibes Night Tour
Philadelphia
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2 hours
from
$2.100 $442
29%
River Cruise Tour on the Seine
Philadelphia
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9 hours
from
$2.100 $1.484

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